Unlock Your Team’s Full Potential with This Simple Mindset Trick!

Teaching basketball skills and plays is important, but it is equally important to teach players the right mindset for the game.

Summary:

  • Teaching players the right mindset for the game is crucial to their success.
  • The palms up gesture is a defense mechanism against the ineffectiveness of whatever happened.
  • The palms down approach is based on control – control of emotions, control of response, and the ability to move more quickly to the next play.
  • The Palms Down approach involves three steps: notice your thoughts and emotions, flip your palms down, reframe your thoughts.
  • The Palms Down approach is based on the idea that our body language can have a powerful impact on our mindset.
  • Integrating mindset training with basketball players can help them develop a strong mindset, improve their performance on the court, and achieve their goals.
  • Six mindset techniques that coaches can teach their players over six weeks, including recognizing the power of thoughts, practicing gratitude, and embracing failure.

 

As a coach, you know that basketball is not just about teaching skills and plays. A key aspect of teaching basketball is to help players develop the right mindset for the game. One important aspect of this is mindset training, specifically teaching players to avoid any gestures or actions that make them feel helpless or out of control.

To illustrate this, let’s play a little thought association game with a gesture. Stand up and give a palms up gesture. What words come to mind? For most people, this gesture is associated with a sense of loss of control and confusion. It often happens after a turnover, an official’s call, or some other unwanted outcome. Another common thought or perception that goes with palms up is “what else could I have done?”

As a coach, you need to help your players avoid gestures, words, or actions that make them feel helpless. The palms up gesture, in particular, creates a sense of helplessness, which is defined as “an inability to act effectively.” It generally follows something going wrong on the court. However, even if things go wrong, there is always some ability to do what has been practiced. Players need to understand that basketball is a game of mistakes, and that learning from those mistakes is an important part of the game.

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Teaching players the right mindset for the game is crucial to their success. While teaching basketball skills and plays is important, it is equally important to teach players that mistakes are a natural part of basketball, and that they should learn from them and move on. The palms up gesture is a defense mechanism to the ineffectiveness of whatever happened. If players can learn to respond to mistakes in a more positive way, it can impact their overall attitude towards the game.

John Wooden once said, “the best teams are the ones that make the most mistakes.” This is because mistakes are a natural part of the learning process.

If players can learn this through youth basketball, it can impact their negative reactions to mistakes. Coaching in a way that does not make players feel like they have to defend their mistakes is crucial to their development. The next blog will be on next play speed, and the palms up gesture interferes with a player’s ability to go to the next play.

Are you looking for ways to boost your players’ confidence?

We are launching age-specific mindset training drills and games that you can quickly and easily incorporate into your practice. By teaching your players to cultivate a winning mindset, you can help them achieve their full potential.

Take the time to assess your team’s attitude towards mistakes. If players can operate without unconscious defense mechanisms for mistakes, their team spirit and culture will improve. This creates a team that can move from a mistake or a whistle without interruption. The palms up gesture is a small gesture that can have a big impact on a player and team.

As an NBA mental skills coach, Graham Betchart teaches players to adopt a palms down approach. This approach is based on control – control of emotions, control of response, and the ability to move more quickly to the next play.

Teaching response mechanisms is a skill that can be taught with equal importance to dribbling, passing, and shooting. As a coach, it is important to teach players the right mindset for the game, including avoiding gestures or actions that make them feel helpless or out of control. With the right mindset and response mechanisms, players can improve their overall attitude towards the game and become more successful on the court.

 

6-Week Mindset Training Plan For Your Team

Here are six mindset techniques that you can teach your players over six weeks.

 

Week 1: Recognize the Power of Your Thoughts

The first week of mindset training should focus on recognizing the power of your thoughts. Start by explaining to your players how their thoughts can affect their beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors on the court. Encourage them to be aware of their self-talk and identify any negative thoughts that may be holding them back.

During practice, have your players practice positive self-talk. For example, instead of saying “I can’t make this shot,” encourage them to say “I can make this shot.” Encourage them to focus on their strengths and what they can do well, rather than their weaknesses.

 

Week 2: Practice Gratitude

The second week of mindset training should focus on practicing gratitude. Start by explaining to your players the benefits of gratitude and how it can help them develop a positive outlook on life. Encourage them to practice gratitude by keeping a gratitude journal or sharing one thing they are grateful for each day.

During practice, have your players start each drill or scrimmage by expressing gratitude for the opportunity to play basketball and for their teammates. Encourage them to focus on what they have, rather than what they lack.

 

Week 3: Embrace Failure

The third week of mindset training should focus on embracing failure. Start by explaining to your players that failure is a natural part of the learning process and can help them improve. Encourage them to see failure as an opportunity to learn and grow, rather than a setback.

During practice, have your players try new drills and techniques that may be challenging for them. Encourage them to take risks and not be afraid of making mistakes. When they do make mistakes, encourage them to reflect on what they can learn from the experience.

 

Week 4: Set Realistic Goals

The fourth week of mindset training should focus on setting realistic goals. Start by explaining to your players the importance of setting goals that are achievable and specific. Encourage them to set goals that are related to their skills and abilities, and not just based on outcomes.

During practice, have your players set individual and team goals. Encourage them to track their progress and celebrate their accomplishments. When they achieve their goals, encourage them to set new ones.

 

Week 5: Surround Yourself with Positive People

The fifth week of mindset training should focus on surrounding yourself with positive people. Start by explaining to your players the impact that their environment can have on their mindset. Encourage them to surround themselves with supportive teammates and coaches.

During practice, encourage your players to support and encourage each other. Create a positive team culture by recognizing and celebrating each other’s successes. If you notice any negative behavior or attitudes, address them and encourage your players to be positive and supportive.

 

Week 6: Practice Self-Care

The sixth and final week of mindset training should focus on practicing self-care. Start by explaining to your players the importance of taking care of their physical and mental health. Encourage them to prioritize rest, nutrition, and stress management.

During practice, encourage your players to take breaks and hydrate regularly. Teach them stress management techniques such as deep breathing or visualization. Encourage them to take care of themselves off the court by getting enough sleep and eating a balanced diet.

 

I hope that one takeaway from this is that mindset training is a skill that can be taught with equal importance to dribbling, passing, and shooting.

Integrating mindset techniques with your basketball players can help them develop a strong and positive mindset, improve their performance on the court, and achieve their goals.

By teaching each technique over six weeks and incorporating them into practice, you can help your players become more resilient, confident, and successful.

 

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